About Us

Our Aim
Our Vision
Our Mission
Our Approach
Safeguarding & Protection Policy
Photography and Filming Policy Statement
Online Safety Policy Statement
Our Aim

The Rochdale Science Initiative is a community interest company, our aim is to create inclusive science engagement opportunities for the under-represented families living in the borough of Rochdale.

Our Vision

Inspired by a ten year old boy’s dream to share his love of science with his family, friends and community the Rochdale Science Initiative (RSI) have turned this dream into our collective dream. As John Lennon said “A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is reality”. Our dream is to inspire, harness and nurture a new generation of science enthusiasts and scientists from families of Rochdale, from those different in cultures and language, to those who are economically marginalised, without time nor money to expend on anything other than the basic needs of food and shelter. Our dream is to work in partnership with other communities, cultural institutions and educational institutions, professional scientists, science communicators and science enthusiasts – In order to create ample of opportunities to inspire, engage, educate and showcase the beauty of science to the under-represented families of Rochdale. We want our communities in Rochdale to be comfortable with science, and collectively as a community to raise the next generation of scientists who will be equipped to take on society’s biggest challenges and opportunities – pandemics, climate change, cyber-security, the future of cities, food security, and space exploration to name a few.

Our Mission

Research conducted by the UK Science Festivals Network (UKSFN) has shown (nationwide) that science festival audiences come from relatively affluent backgrounds; people who are already visiting the theatre, museums and galleries. Whilst science festivals appealing to such audiences can be celebrated as successful engagement, we cannot overlook the original endeavours of science engagement initiatives – to reach those who are not engaging with science.

If parents and adults of the under-represented communities in Rochdale are to feel comfortable with science, and the under-represented young people are to become excited and inspired about all the branches of science, then science needs to come to them.

Rochdale Science Initiative will strive to bring science directly into the heart of the under-represented communities, enter their household, and empower the under-represented families living in Rochdale with science capital.

Our Approach

Rochdale Science Initiative (RSI) flagship event Rochdale Science Extravaganza, a one day event – strategically placed in our local area, and in the future will move to other areas of Rochdale – provides opportunities for the under-represented people of Rochdale to informally engage with and explore the beautiful spectrum of science. Evaluation from previous event can clearly demonstrate how Rochdale Science Extravaganza event can engage hundreds of under-represented people from our community and the wider communities of Rochdale.

Moving forward RSI will implement recommendations from previous year’s event, and always work with; influential community leaders, youth workers, educational institutions, cultural institutions, local science professionals and science enthusiasts to continue with the legacy of curating innovative Rochdale Science Extravaganza event.

As RSI is based upon the legacy set by a ten year old boy’s dream, we are keen to support and develop a youth team. The aim is to recruit a diverse range of talented young people from the under-represented communities of Rochdale, they will get the opportunity to work alongside the directors of RSI to create contents and help make decisions in regards to future projects.

RSI firmly believes science education should not just be about training a scientific workforce, science has to be fun and engaging for everyone. Our communities have to feel comfortable and excited by scientific discoveries. RSI will create partnership with science museum, science departments within colleges and universities in order to secure guided tours from science museums, and opportunities to partake in public engagement activities offered by colleges and universities for the young people and their parents. This initiative would strengthen the science interest of the many under-represented families living in Rochdale.

Science engagement is at the heart of what we do. As our audience is the under-represented families living in Rochdale, we will ensure our science communication and public engagement will be diverse and representative of the communities that we represent. RSI flagship Rochdale Science Extravaganza event provides a platform to showcase and celebrate the diversity in science, we will make every effort to ensure all involved represent diversity at its fullest capacity.

Safeguarding & Protection Policy

As Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C works with children and young people all stakeholders including volunteers are fully DBS checked. Our organisation is fully committed to keeping children safe and protected from harm.

This page explains how Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C safeguarding protection policy will keep children safe and protected from harm.

Contents

1.If you are Worried about a Child
2.What to do if you have Concerns about a Child
3.Making a Notification of Concern to Social Work/Police

  1. If you are Worried about a Child

Concerns about a child can arise in a number of ways, e.g. an accumulation of concerns, a single significant incident, reports from the child themselves, observation of child/parent interaction or information from a relative or a member of the public.

The child may be living with or affected by:

  • Problematic alcohol and/or drug use;
  • Mental health / illness;
  • Disability;
  • Domestic abuse;
  • Neglect.

There may be signs which cause concerns and could be an indication of a child being abused neglected or exploited

The child may:

  • Have unexplained bruising or bruising in an unusual place;
  • Appear afraid, quiet or withdrawn;
  • Be afraid to go home;
  • Appear hungry, tired or unkempt;
  • Be left unattended or unsupervised;
  • Have too much responsibility for their age;
  • Be acting out in a sexually inappropriate way;
  • Be misusing drugs or alcohol.

Not all children who are abused or neglected will display these signs and equally a child may display some of these signs and symptoms for other reasons.

  1. What to do if you have Concerns about a Child

Children rarely tell if they are being abused. If a child tells something which suggests they have been abused or may be at risk of abuse this should never be ignored.

If a child or a young person gives you information that suggests that he or she is being abused or makes you worried about the child you should:

Remain calm, no matter how difficult it is to listen to the child.

Listen to the child and take them seriously. Reassure them they were right to tell.

Keep any questions to a minimum, for clarification purposes, and never interrupt.

Tell the child what you are going to do next and tell them that you are going to have to speak to someone who can help.

As soon as is practical write down everything that the child has told you using the child’s exact words if possible. Make a note of the date, time, place and people who were present and sign the notes you have made recording the date and time they were written.

Act promptly and immediately report your concerns to the Child Protection Lead if the Child Protection Lead is not available then report your concerns to the Deputy Child Protection Lead. You should also follow local procedures for sharing these concerns with the Named Person When there are concerns about the child’s safety or possible harm to the child, these should be shared immediately and without delay with police or social services so that they can consider whether the harm is significant (Sometimes it can be difficult to know if a child is being abused or at risk of abuse. You might have general concerns about a child or they may have told you something. If you are worried you should report your concerns to the Child Protection Lead or the Deputy. You should seek advice from colleagues, managers, designated or named professionals or other agencies where appropriate, but these discussions should never delay emergency action to protect a child. These concerns should be written down whether or not further action is being taken and should include a note of the date and who took part in the discussion. At the close of discussion there should be clear and explicit agreement about who will be taking what action, or that no further action will be taken.

A suspicion of abuse may take the form of ‘concerns’ rather than ‘known facts’. Concerns can and should be shared with the Child Protection Lead or the Deputy. While concerns may not necessarily trigger a child protection referral in themselves, they may help build up a picture, along with concerns from other sources, which suggest that a child may be suffering harm, this is particularly the case for situations of neglect.

All staff should be clear that they are passing on concerns as part of their responsibility, and that this cannot be on an anonymous basis.

  1. Making a Notification of Concern to Social Services/Police

If a child tells you something, or you suspect a child is being abused or at risk of abuse, you must report your concerns to the Child Protection Lead. You should also follow local procedures for sharing these concerns with the Named Person If there are possible Child Protection concerns then a referral should be made to the Social Services or, in an emergency, to the Police. This will either be made by the Child Protection Lead or the Deputy.

A notification of concern should be made to the Social Services as soon as a problem, suspicion or concern becomes apparent. Notification of concerns should be made to the Child Protection Lead and in an emergency to the Police, stating clearly that you want to make a child protection referral/ and then follow up the concern in writing.

It does not matter if you do not have all the information below, do not delay in sharing concern. Wherever possible pass on the following information (Child Protection Lead/ Deputy) and others in case of the Lead/ Deputy being unavailable:

Your Information

  • Your name
  • contact details
  • your involvement with the family

Childs Information

  • The child’s full name
  • Age
  • date of birth
  • address
  • The child’s current whereabouts and who they are with and what you are concerned about

Parents/ Guardians Information

  • The name
  • Age
  • Address of the child’s parents/carers and/or any other adults who have care of the child

Information with regards to alleged harm

  • Who it is thought may have harmed the child or may pose a risk to them
  • where and what may have happened.
  • Is the child in imminent danger.
  • Any other children who may also be at risk providing their: names, DOB, address etc.
  • The name, age and address of any other person known to have information on the alleged or suspected abuse.
  • Whether there are any other agencies currently involved with the family (if known) e.g. health visitor, teacher, school nurse or any other health professional involved with the family, including the parents/carers.
  • Whether there have been any previous concerns about this child or other children in the household.
  • Whether the child has any disabilities or special needs (if so further information regarding the child’s diagnosis if any, the main difficulties affecting functioning, any medical conditions, how the child communicates and expresses emotions should be provided).
  • Whether there are any cultural or religious factors which need to be taken into account.
  • Whether the parents are aware of the concerns and if so what is their reaction.

Following report

  • Record the name of the person you passed the concern to

It is important that you bring to the attention of the Child Protection Lead/ Duty any concern and for the Lead/ Deputy to notify the Social Services or the Police (in emergencies) as soon as it has been decided that this is the appropriate course of action.

Last reviewed; 09/07/2019
Lead Officer; Mohammed Ali
Deputy Officer; Mohammed Rahman

Photography and Filming Policy Statement

Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C works with children and families as part of its activities. These include:

  • Rochdale Science Extravaganza event
  • RSI Science Club

The purpose of this policy statement is to:

  • protect children and young people who take part in Rochdale Science Initiative’s services, events and activities, specifically those where photographs and videos may be taken
  • set out the overarching principles that guide our approach to photographs/videos being taken of children and young people during our events and activities
  • to ensure that we operate in line with our values and within the law when creating, using and sharing images of children and young people

This policy statement applies to all staff, volunteers and other adults associated with Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C

Legal framework

This policy has been drawn up on the basis of legislation, policy and guidance that seeks to protect children in England. Summaries of key legislation and guidance is available on:

We believe that:

  • children and young people should never experience abuse of any kind
  • we have a responsibility to promote the welfare of all children and young people and to take, share and use images of children safely.

We recognise that:

  • the welfare of the children and young people taking part in our activities is paramount
  • children and their parents/carers have a right to decide whether their images are taken and how these may be used, regardless of age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex or sexual orientation
  • consent to take images of children is only meaningful when the children and their parents/carers understand the potential risks associated with the use and distribution of these images
  • there are potential risks associated with sharing images of children online.

More information about this is available from learning.nspcc.org.uk/research-resources/briefings photography-sharing-images-guidance

We will seek to keep children and young people safe by:

  • always asking for written consent from a child and their parents or carers before taking and using a child’s image
  • changing the names of children whose images are being used in our published material whenever possible (and only using first names if we do need to identify them)
  • never publishing personal information about individual children
  • making sure children, their parents and carers understand how images of children will be securely stored and for how long (including how we will control access to the images and their associated information)
  • reducing the risk of images being copied and used inappropriately by:
  • only using images of children in appropriate clothing (including safety wear if necessary)
  • avoiding full face and body shots of children taking part in activities such as swimming where there may be a heightened risk of images being misused
  • using images that positively reflect young people’s involvement in the activity.

We will also develop a procedure for reporting the abuse or misuse of images of children as part of our child protection procedures. We will ensure everyone involved in our organisation knows the procedures to follow to keep children safe.

Photography and/or filming for personal use

When children themselves, parents/carers or spectators are taking photographs or filming at our events and the images are for personal use, we will publish guidance about image sharing in the event programmes and/or announce details of our photography policy before the start of the event. This includes:

  • reminding parents/carers and children that they need to give consent for

Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C to take and use images of children

  • asking for photos taken during the event not to be shared on social media or asking people to gain permission from children and their parents/carers before sharing photographs and videos that include them
  • recommending that people check the privacy settings of their social media account to understand who else will be able to view any images they share
  • reminding children, parents and carers who they can talk to if they have any  concerns about images being shared. Photography and/or filming for Rochdale Science Initiative’s use

We recognise that our group leaders may use photography and filming as an aid in activities such as music or drama. However, children/young people and their parents/carers must be made aware that this is part of the programme and give written consent.

If we hire a photographer for one of our events, we will seek to keep children and young people safe by:

  • providing the photographer with a clear brief about appropriate content and behaviour
  • ensuring the photographer wears identification at all times
  • informing children and parents/carers that a photographer will be at the event and ensuring they give written consent to images which feature their child being taken and shared
  • not allowing the photographer to have unsupervised access to children
  • not allowing the photographer to carry out sessions outside the event or at a child’s home
  • reporting concerns regarding inappropriate or intrusive photography following our child protection procedures.

Photography and/or filming for wider use

If people such as local journalists, professional photographers (not hired by Rochdale Science Initiative) or students wish to record one of our events and share the images professionally or in the wider world, they should seek permission in advance.

They should provide:

  • the name and address of the person using the camera
  • the names of children they wish to take images of (if possible)
  • the reason for taking the images and/or what the images will be used for
  • a signed declaration that the information provided is valid and that the images will only be used for the reasons given.

Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C will verify these details and decide whether to grant permission for photographs/films to be taken. We will seek consent from the children who are the intended subjects of the images and their parents and inform the photographer of anyone who does not give consent.

At the event we will inform children, parents and carers that an external photographer is present and ensure they are easily identifiable, for example by using them with a coloured identification badge.

If Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C is concerned that someone unknown to us is using our sessions for photography or filming purposes, we will ask them to leave and (depending on the nature of the concerns) follow our child protection procedures.

Storing images

We will store photographs and videos of children securely, in accordance with our safeguarding policy and data protection law.

We will keep hard copies of images in a locked drawer and electronic images in a protected folder with restricted access. Images will be stored for a period no longer than is necessary for the purposes for which it was processed.

We will never store images of children on unencrypted portable equipment such as laptops, memory sticks and mobile phones.

Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C does not permit staff and volunteers to using any personal equipment to take photos and recordings of children. Only cameras or devices belonging to the Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C should be used.

Related policies and procedures

This policy statement should be read alongside our organisational policies and procedures, including:

  • Child protection.
  • Procedures for responding to concerns about a child or young person’s wellbeing.
  • Code of conduct for staff and volunteers.
  • Online safety policy and procedures for responding to concerns about online abuse.

Last reviewed; 09/07/2019
Lead Officer; Mohammed Ali
Deputy Officer; Mohammed Rahman

Online Safety Policy Statement

This policy should be read alongside Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C’s policies and procedures on child protection and safeguarding.

The purpose of this policy statement, Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C works with children and families as part of its activities.

These include: 

  • Rochdale Science Extravaganza event
  • RSI Science Club

The purpose of this policy statement is to:

  • ensure the safety and well-being of children and young people is paramount when adults, young people or children are using the internet, social media or mobile devices
  • provide staff and volunteers with the overarching principles that guide our approach to online safety
  • ensure that, as an organisation, we operate in line with our values and within the law in terms of how we use online devices.
  • The policy statement applies to all staff, volunteers, children and young people and anyone involved in Rochdale Science Initiative’s activities.

Legal Framework

This policy has been drawn up on the basis of legislation, policy and guidance that seeks to protect children in England.

Summaries of the key legislation and guidance are available on:

We believe that:

  • children and young people should never experience abuse of any kind
  • children should be able to use the internet for education and personal development, but safeguards need to be in place to ensure they are kept safe at all times.

We recognise that:

  • the online world provides everyone with many opportunities; however it can also present risks and challenges
  • we have a duty to ensure that all children, young people and adults involved in our organisation are protected from potential harm online
  • we have a responsibility to help keep children and young people safe online, whether or not they are using Rochdale Science Initiative C.I.C’s network and devices
  • all children, regardless of age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex or sexual orientation, have the right to equal protection from all types of harm or abuse
  • working in partnership with children, young people, their parents, carers and other agencies is essential in promoting young people’s welfare and in helping young people to be responsible in their approach to online safety.

We will seek to keep children and young people safe by:

  • appointing an online safety coordinator
  • providing clear and specific directions to staff and volunteers on how to behave online through our behaviour code for adults
  • supporting and encouraging the young people using our service to use the internet, social media and mobile phones in a way that keeps them safe and shows respect for others
  • supporting and encouraging parents and carers to do what they can to keep their children safe online
  • developing an online safety agreement for use with young people and their parents/carers
  • developing clear and robust procedures to enable us to respond appropriately to any incidents of inappropriate online behaviour, whether by an adult or a child/young person
  • reviewing and updating the security of our information systems regularly
  • ensuring that user names, logins, email accounts and passwords are used effectively
  • ensuring personal information about the adults and children who are involved in our organisation is held securely and shared only as appropriate
  • ensuring that images of children, young people and families are used only after their written permission has been obtained, and only for the purpose for which consent has been given
    providing supervision, support and training for staff and volunteers about online safety
  • examining and risk assessing any social media platforms and new technologies before they are used within the organisation.

If online abuse occurs, we will respond to it by:

  • having clear and robust safeguarding procedures in place for responding to abuse (including online abuse)
  • providing support and training for all staff and volunteers on dealing with all forms of abuse, including bullying cyberbullying, emotional abuse, sexting, sexual abuse and sexual exploitation
  • making sure our response takes the needs of the person experiencing abuse, any bystanders and our organisation as a whole into account
  • reviewing the plan developed to address online abuse at regular intervals, in order to ensure that any problems have been resolved in the long term.

Related policies and procedures

  • This policy statement should be read alongside our organisational policies and procedures, including:
  • Child protection
  • Procedures for responding to concerns about a child or young person’s wellbeing
  • Dealing with allegations of abuse made against a child or young person
  • Photography and image sharing guidance

Last reviewed; 09/07/2019
Lead Officer; Mohammed Ali
Deputy Officer; Mohammed Rahman

Our Team

Labib Rahman

Founding Ambassador

Mohammed Rahman

Founding CEO

Mohammed Goolshad Miah

Chairman

Mohammed Arshad Ali

Secretary

Abdul Alim

Treasurer

Muhammad Abdus Shahid

Project Manager

Hasina Begum

Science Content Advisor

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